INÈS BLUMENCWEIG
Structures dynamiques

Exhibition: January 18 – February 24, 2024

GEOMETRIC RENAISSANCE
Reflections on Inès Blumencweig’s reliefs from 1967 to 1988

Domitille d’Orgeval, art historian

We all remember the exhibition Elles font l’abstraction at the Centre Pompidou, which highlighted the process by which “women artists” had been rendered
invisible, bringing to light those whose careers had remained relatively unknown or, in the best of cases, reassessing the role they had played in the history of art. The event was unfortunately held in 2020, a little too early for Inès Blumencweig to be featured. Indeed, she would have been a worthy inclusion, alongside, for example, Carmen Herrera, a Cuban artist who was rediscovered at the age of 80 and who went on to have a retrospective dedicated to her work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York before passing away at the age of 106.

We would like to wish Inès Blumencweig the same kind of destiny, having reemerged on the art scene in 2022 with an exhibition organised by Jordi Ballart from the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA), at the Maison de l’Amérique Latine, after more than forty years of silence. The exhibition at the Diane de Polignac Gallery, which is a continuation of this ongoing process of restoration, presents a magnificent group of works from the 1970s, created by Inès Blumencweig ten years after her arrival in Italy. The Argentine-born artist, who had begun a promising career in Buenos Aires – where she had a solo exhibition at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Buenos Aires in 1960 – moved to Rome with her husband, the painter Mario Pucciarelli, with the help of a grant awarded to the latter for the Torcuato Di Tella national painting award. From then on, the couple settled in a studio in Via del Babuino, then in another studio in Via Canova, where they created works in an atmosphere marked by a great deal of emulation. They frequented the most prominent artists of the day, including Lucio Fontana, Mimmo Rotella, Carla Accardi, Antonio Sanfilippo, Umberto Mastroianni, Achille Perilli, Piero Dorazio and Afro Basaldella, and found themselves at the heart of all the avant-garde movements, from Spatialism to Arte Programmata and Arte Povera.

Inès Blumencweig’s work embodies a highly personal synthesis of all these movements, which she also knew well from her work as an art journalist for the Agenzia Nazionale Stampa Associata (ANSA). Although her Italian works from the 1960s and 1970s mark a break from her surrealist and informal periods, the exceptional quality of their execution reflects her initial training at the Fernando Fader School of Decorative Arts in Buenos Aires, where she was taught the Bauhaus methods of craft and design, as well as the principles of gestaltism (1).

(1) Psychological and philosophical theory published by Christian von Ehrenfels in 1890. Gestalt psychologists emphasize that organisms perceive entire patterns or configurations, not merely individual components. In the second half of the 1950s, Gestalt theories were taught at the School of Fine Arts in Buenos Aires by the courses of “Psychology of form and vision“ taught by Héctor Carthier.

The reliefs presented by the Diane de Polignac Gallery, which combine painted wood and coloured ribbons, bear witness to Inès Blumencweig’s focus on structural and perceptual issues, in formats that give precedence to the quadrangle and the hexagon, as well as, more rarely, the circle. With rigour and a very geometric sense of clarity, her reliefs incorporate space and light in a robust yet delicate articulation of planes and ribbons – from one work to the next, the artist experiments with symmetry, oblique angles, mirrored perspectives, and more. The sheer number and complexity of the combinations envisaged, recorded in notebooks of preliminary sketches, is impressive. In addition to Inès Blumencweig’s seemingly boundless inventiveness, the artist has mastered the art of colour association, which she applies subtly with pastel shades, or in sharper contrast when she sets light and dark tones (black, white, blue and red) against each other, or when reds, pinks and purples are used side by side. The visual effects that result vary according to how the artist manipulates her ribbons, which she distributes in the internal space of the work in more loose or contracted arrangements, and which she then orients at oblique angles and sometimes twists into fascinating clusters. In this way, she activates ever-changing spatial relationships, producing chromatic vibrations that are renewed and intensified as a function of the light and our movements. The importance of perspective cannot be overlooked when considering the reliefs by Inès Blumencweig, who uses very unrestricted methods of mounting the pieces – suspending them, for example – so that when they engage with real space, they assert their presence as objects. In that respect, her work follows the geometric works of Argentine artists in the Madí group – Carmelo Arden Quin, Gyula Kosice, etc. – who, from the end of the 1940s onwards, advocated the use of polygonal, articulated or manipulable structures to give priority to the dynamics of invention. Similarly, Inès Blumencweig’s works do not seek to achieve the visual disturbance and instability of optical and kinetic art, but her use of ribbon echoes Alberto Biasi’s treatment of PVC strips in his contemporary reliefs. We might also look at Walter Leblanc’s Torsions, which were conceived in a very radical spirit, with the use of a single colour and structure.

Always in touch with the creations of her time, Inès Blumencweig has worked in the silence of her studio-laboratory, giving priority to pure creativity, without having to give in to any compromises or constraints in terms of what she can make. There can be no doubt that her geometric creations stand out today for the precision of their execution as much as for the wise complexity and inventive grace of their compositions.

Inès Blumencweig, Rome, 1962. Photo: Alfio di Bella

Inès Blumencweig, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1960. Courtesy of the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) Library and Archives

Inès Blumencweig, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1960. Courtesy of the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) Library and Archives

POSTCARDS

Benjamin de Roubaix, artist’s nephew

My father, the film score composer François de Roubaix, died tragically in a diving accident off the Canary Islands on 21 November 1975, when I was just six months old. Two years later, my mother, the dancer Rosario Luna, married Pancho (Herbert) Blumencweig. A musician himself, Pancho would raise me as his own son. His sister Inès Blumencweig quite naturally thought of me as her own nephew and I would see her quite often during my childhood, particularly during the time she spent in France from 1980 to 1987, when I was between the ages of five and twelve. She would also send me a letter or postcard every year on my birthday with a small drawing or cut-out from Rome, where she worked with her husband Mario Pucciarelli.

I remember asking Pancho one time, “Why does Inès cram so much into her postcards?” Indeed, she used to fill her postcards with so much writing that they
ended up looking like a page from the Talmud. I never really got an answer to that question but now, having looked at a great deal of her work, I could say that perhaps she had a need to fill the space, to create and shape it, as she did all her life with her countless and magnificent works – with grace, with intelligence, with strength, with pride, with colour, and sometimes with anger faced at injustice but always, I think, with love.

Pancho Blumencweig playing the double bass on the rooftops of Tel Aviv, 1961. Photo: Inès Blumencweig

Visual artist, Inès Blumencweig is also a poet. Music lover, she particularly appreciates Jazz to which she dedicates this poem. Music is a source of inspiration for her. Her relief-artworks with colorful stripes recall musical scores. Stretched ribbons are like the strings of an imaginary instrument. Ready to be pinched, they already seem to emit a sound. Twisted, they seem to come alive. Aligned, they give rhythm. Multicolored, they evoke variations of tones, musical or pictorial. Inès Blumencweig’s works are sound.

EL JAZZ, 1981
Como se llega a cantar tan encantadoramente el jazz
solo los negros, solo los negros… esos espirituals siguen
en el jazz – Entre bajos-altos, agudos profundos
esa voz gorda, consistente, pastosa, sentida…
Maravilla del feeling – Natural como la belleza
colorada de estas flores silvestres que tengo
ante mi, rojo-rosados, violas-violetas, blancoamarillentas
en medio de un mar de hojas verdes,
pequeñitas, ovaladas, tersas, brillantes, verde oscuros
contra las hojas acontadas de las flores –
Así es tu voz Ella Fitzgerald terciopelo, duro
tenso, suave, fuerte contra este vals que ahora
escucho, como tan distintos, los dos bellos –
Gounod – versus be bop –
INÈS 8/1/81 (Bar Canova)
BLUMENCWEIG RM

LE JAZZ, 1981
Comment arriver à chanter avec tant d’enchantement le jazz
seulement les noirs, seulement les noirs… ces Spirituals continuent
dans le jazz – Entre bas-hauts, aigus profonds
cette voix pleine, consistante, épaisse, sincère…
merveille du feeling – Naturel comme la beauté
colorée de ces fleurs sylvestres que j’ai
devant moi, rouge-rosacées, pourpres-violettes, blancjaunissantes,
au milieu d’une mer de feuilles vertes,
toutes petites, ovales, lisses, brillantes, vert foncées,
contre les feuilles étayées des fleurs –
Ainsi est ta voix Ella Fitzgerald velours, dur
tendu, suave, forte contre cette valse que maintenant
j’écoute, comme si distincts, les deux beaux –
Gounod – versus be bop-
INÈS 8/1/81 (Bar Canova)
BLUMENCWEIG RM

EXHIBITED ARTWORKS

Struttura bianco-nero-azzurra, 1967
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
84,5 x 64,5 x 10 cm / 33.3 x 25.4 x 3.9 in.
Signed, located, dated and titled “Inès Blumencweig Roma – 1967 Struttura-bianco-nero-azzurra“ on reverse

Ocre / Giallo, 1971
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
80 x 50 x 3,5 cm / 31.5 x 19.7 x 1.4 in.
Titled “Ocre/Giallo“ on reverse
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 1971“ twice on reverse

Untitled, 1971 (Detail)

Untitled, 1971
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
79,5 x 69 x 3,5 cm / 31.3 x 27.2 x 1.38 in.
Signed and dated “Blumencweig 2/7/1971“ on reverse

Struttura Esagonale, 1971
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
100 x 87 x 3 cm / 39.4 x 34.3 x 1.2 in.
Signed, located and dated “I. Blumencweig Roma – 1971“ on reverse
Titled “Struttura Esagonale“ on reverse

Untitled, 1973
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
30,5 x 60 x 15 cm / 12 x 23.6 x 6 in.
Located, signed and dated “Roma Blumencweig – 1973“ under the base

Untitled, 1973 (Detail)

Untitled, 1973
Pencil, colored pencil and felt pen on paper
40 x 30 cm / 15.8 x 11.8 in.
Signed and dated “Blumencweig 1973“ lower right

Untitled, 1973
Pencil, colored pencil and felt pen on paper
39,5 x 30 cm / 15.6 x 11.8 in.
Signed and dated “Blumencweig 1973“ lower right

Untitled, 1973
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
81,5 x 81,5 x 8 cm / 32.1 x 32.1 x 3.2 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma – 1973“ on reverse

Untitled, 1973
Pencil and felt pen on paper
39,5 x 30 cm / 15.6 x 11.8 in.
Signed and located “Blumencweig 1973“ lower right

Untitled, 1973
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
95 x 95 x 6 cm / 37.4 x 37.4 x 2.4 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma – Aprile 1973“ on reverse

Untitled, 1974
Pencil on paper
48 x 34 cm / 19 x 13.4 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma Agosto 1974“ lower right

Blue B, 1974
Painted wood
99 x 49,5 x 4 cm / 39 x 19.5 x 1.6 in.
Titled “Blue B“ on reverse. Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 01.1974“ on reverse

Blum, 1975
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
22 x 94 x 3,5 cm / 8.7 x 37 x 1.4 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 10/4/75“ on reverse

Untitled, 1975
Pencil, colored pencil and felt pen on paper
23,5 x 34 cm – 9.3 x 13.4 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 3/1975“ lower left. Inscribed “Descripcion del objeto“ lower right

Untitled, 1975
Pencil, colored pencil and felt pen on paper
46 x 34 cm / 18.1 x 13.4 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 3/75“ lower right

Struttura cromo dinamica, 1975
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
115 x 40 x 2 cm / 45.3 x 15.8 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located, dated and titled “Blumencweig Roma 25/5/75
Struttura cromo dinamica“ on reverse

Struttura cromo dinamica, 1975
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
118 x 42 x 3 cm / 46.5 x 16.5 x 1.2 in.
Signed, located, dated and titled “Blumencweig Roma 10/6/75 Struttura cromo dinamica“ on reverse

Struttura cromo dinamica, 1975 (Detail)

Untitled, 1975
Pencil, colored pencil and felt pen on paper
46 x 34 cm / 18.1 x 13.4 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 2/75“ lower right

Untitled, 1976
Watercolor and pencil on paper
45,5 x 31 cm / 17.9 x 12.2 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 1/12/76“ lower right

Rouge violet, 1976
Painted wood
35 x 28,5 x 2 cm / 13.8 x 11.2 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 7/12/1976“ on
reverse. Titled “Rouge Violet“ on reverse

Struttura Dinamica, 1976
Painted wood
40,5 x 83 x 5 cm / 15.9 x 32.7 x 2 in.
Signed, located, dated and titled “Blumencweig Roma 2/1976 Struttura Dinamica“ on reverse

Untitled, 1977 (Detail)

Untitled, 1977
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
63 x 20,5 x 2 cm / 24.8 x 8.1 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma Agosto 1977“ on reverse

Untitled, 1977
Painted wood
40,5 x 38,5 x 2 cm / 15.9 x 15.2 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 27/12/1977“ on reverse

Untitled, 1977
Painted wood
40 x 40 x 2cm / 15.8 x 15.8 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 16/11/1977“ on reverse

Untitled, 1978
Pencil and colored pencil on paper
34 x 48 cm / 13.4 x 19 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 1978“ lower left

Pieni e vuoti, 1978
Painted wood
38,5 x 45,5 x 4,5 cm – 15.2 x 17.9 x 1.8 in.
Titled, signed and dated “Pieni e vuoti Blumencweig 1978“ under the base
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 1978“ under the base

Untitled, 1978
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
60 x 60 x 2 cm / 23.6 x 23.6 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 25/5/78“ on reverse

Untitled, 1978
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
60 x 60 x 2 cm – 23.6 x 23.6 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 25/5/78“ on reverse

Untitled, 1978
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
60 x 60 x 2 cm / 23.6 x 23.6 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 25/5/78“ on reverse

Untitled, 1978
Pencil and colored pencil on paper
34 x 48 cm – 13.4 x 19 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 1978“ lower left

Struttura serie cromatica, 1978
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
100 x 87 x 2 cm / 39.4 x 34.3 x 0.8 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 13/8/1978“ on reverse. Titled “Struttura Serie Cromatica“ on reverse

Struttura esagonale a 2 duplici triangoli, 1988
Painted wood and nylon ribbons
90,5 x 81,5 x 2,5 cm / 35.6 x 32.1 x 1 in.
Signed, located and dated “Blumencweig Roma 26/12/88“ on reverse
Titled and dated “Struttura esagonale a 2 duplici triangoli, 88“ on reverse
Inscribed “d’un disegno faisino 1983“ on reverse

Biography

Inès Blumencweig (1930)

THE PAINTER INÈS BLUMENCWEIG ’S ORIGINS AND TRAINING (1930-1948)

Born in Buenos Aires on 16 June 1930, Inès Blumencweig bears the family name of her Polish father, Leonardo Blumencweig, who arrived in Argentina at about fifteen years old. Inès’ mother, Alberta, was also of Eastern European descent. Her family, the Peltzmans, settled in Argentina at the beginning of the 20th century, around the same time as the creation of the Jewish Colonisation Association. Established in London by Baron Maurice de Hirsch in 1891, the association was created to promote the emigration of European Jewish families to Argentina by creating agricultural colonies that would enable them to leave Europe in the face of rising anti-Semitism. These families became known as “judíos gauchos” (1).

In 1943, Inès Blumencweig enrolled at the Fernando Fader School of Decorative Arts in Buenos Aires. Inspired by the Bauhaus, the school offered courses in crafts and design. After completing her training at the age of 18, the young artist frequented the studios of Argentine surrealist painters Nélida Demichelis and Juan Batlle Planas (1911-1966). As a result, Blumencweig’s early works were steeped in Surrealist influences. In Juan Batlle Planas’ studio, she met the painters Roberto Aizenberg (1928-1996), Julio Silva (1930-2020) and Victor Chab (b. 1930), with whom she became close friends.

THE 1950s: BETWEEN SURREALISM AND NON-FIGURATIVE PAINTING

In the 1950s, Blumencweig turned to non-figurative painting and became closely associated with the “Informalist” movement (Movimiento Informalista) that was founded by the Argentinian artists Kenneth Kemble (1923-1998), Luis Alberto Wells (1939-2023), Alberto Greco (1931-1965) and Mario Pucciarelli (1928-2014).

In 1952, Blumencweig showed her work at an exhibition at the Museo de Artes Plásticas Eduardo Sívori in Buenos Aires. Two years later, she took part in an exhibition of young Surrealist painters at the Wilenski Gallery, also in Buenos Aires. Blumencweig’s work was also shown at the Galatea Gallery, the Plástica Gallery and the Rubbers Gallery in 1956, 1957 and 1958, respectively.

THE 1960s: TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATE S AND RELOCATION TO ITALY

Inès Blumencweig married Mario Pucciarelli in 1960. That same year, a solo exhibition devoted to the artist was presented at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Buenos Aires. Between 1960 and 1961, works by Inès Blumencweig were included in the travelling exhibition Pintura Argentina contemporánea, which presented Argentinian artists in contemporary art museums in Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires.

Mario Pucciarelli won the Torcuato Di Tella national painting award – named after the leading patron of Argentine avant-garde art at the time – and was awarded a scholarship to spend a year living in Rome. The award also meant that Pucciarelli was nominated for the Guggenheim Fellowship, an American prize awarded by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation on an annual basis since 1925. This gave the couple the opportunity to travel to the United States in the autumn of 1960. They visited New York and Washington, where they discovered the Abstract Expressionism movement. It was a major turning point for Blumencweig, who returned from the trip with the desire to make a clean break from the past and approach painting in a completely different way. In this respect, she was perfectly in tune with the artistic trends of the early 1960s, which sought to break away from the painting styles of the previous decade. It was under that impulse that Blumencweig introduced metal into her work.

(1) L’expression a été inventée par l’écrivain Alberto Gerchunoff dans son livre Los Gauchos judíos (1910).

Inès Blumencweig and Mario Pucciarelli moved to Rome in 1961, where, thanks to Pucciarelli’s award, they were able to get a studio in the heart of the city, on Via del Babuino. The couple began to sell their works and Blumencweig also earned a living as a journalist writing for art magazines. They decided to settle in Rome for good

The 1960s was a frenetic, vibrant decade for the art scene in Italy, marked by movements ranging from Germano Celant’s Arte Povera and the Arte Programmata movement – the Italian branch of kinetic art – to Lucio Fontana’s Spatialism. The Pucciarelli-Blumencweig couple were in contact with a whole community of artists, including Lucio Fontana (also Argentinian), Mimmo Rotella (1918-2006), Carla Accardi (1924-2014), Antonio Sanfilippo (1923-1980), Umberto Mastroianni (1910-1998), Achille Perilli (1927-2021), Piero Dorazio (1927-2005), Afro Basaldella (1912-1976), Aldemir Martins (1922-2006) and Joaquín Roca Rey (1923-2004).

Blumencweig made a contribution to avant-garde Italian movements by creating canvas works pierced with metal blades. As such, she introduced concepts of rhythm, space and optics to her works, playing on the ambivalent relationship between painting and sculpture. Blumencweig demonstrated great technical virtuosity in her mastery of such materials thanks to her prior training in the decorative arts. The artist called these metal works Structures Sensibles. In 1963, the Miami Museum of Modern Art presented a solo exhibition dedicated to the artist’s work. From 1964 onwards, her work was shown at a number of galleries in Rome, including the Galleria Pogliani and the Galleria P21, as well as the Galleria La Metopa in Bari.

While continuing her artistic investigations, Blumencweig worked as an art journalist for the Agenzia Nazionale Stampa Associata (ANSA) – the leading news agency in Italy and the fifth largest in the world, founded in Rome in 1945 – between 1965 and 1990. In that role, she wrote commentaries on Italian cultural life and kept a close eye on the latest advances in the arts. Blumencweig also made contributions to Latin American magazines from Rome.

WORKS IN WOOD AND NYLON

Towards the end of the 1960s, Blumencweig replaced the metal in her works with wooden bases, which she cut, drilled and painted with acrylic paint. The wooden base took on all different kinds of geometric forms, freeing the artist from the traditional rectangular form. Blumencweig then added coloured nylon ribbons that she would stretch, twist and coil on the base, their contortions reminiscent of the coloured bands in kinetic works.

In 1980, the Galleria P21 in Rome organised what would be Inès Blumencweig’s last solo exhibition for 42 years – until the recent solo exhibition dedicated to her work at the Maison de l’Amérique Latine in 2022. Blumencweig lived in France, between Paris and Nice, from 1981 to 1987. She had several exhibitions in galleries in France, where she continued her work with wood and nylon ribbons before finally returning to Rome.  Although, as an artist, Inès Blumencweig has always been firmly rooted in the artistic explorations of her times, her work remains relatively unknown. She is often presented as a “foreign artist” in Italy, even though her work has been exhibited there on numerous occasions.

REDISCOVERING THE WORK OF INÈS BLUMENCWEIG

Inès Blumencweig’s work was rediscovered in 2020 when a study was conducted into her husband’s work by the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA). Founded in 2011 and based in New York, the ISLAA is dedicated to enriching knowledge of modern and contemporary Latin American art through a programme of exhibitions, publications and conferences open to the public, students and researchers.

Jordi Ballart, project director at the ISLAA and exhibition curator, met Inès Blumencweig at her studio in Rome. He then organised an exhibition at the Maison de l’Amérique Latine in Paris in 2022-2023 entitled Inès Blumencweig, Structures Sensibles. The exhibition paid tribute to the artist through a series of eleven significant works created between 1961 and 1978, on loan from the ISLAA’s collection in New York. As Inès Blumencweig’s first solo show since 1980, the exhibition highlighted her contribution to the Italian art movements of the 1960s and 1970s, notably Spatialism, Arte Povera and Arte Programmata.

Benjamin de Roubaix & Mathilde Gubanski © Galerie Diane de Polignac

With the participation of Jordi Ballart Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA)

Inès Blumencweig, Buenos Aires, 1965 ca.

Inès Blumencweig, Miramar Buenos Aires, 1945 ca.

Inès Blumencweig & Mario Pucciarelli au bord du Tibre, Rome, 1966

Inès Blumencweig, Provincia de Buenos Aires, 1944

SELECTED COLLECTIONS

Buenos Aires (Argentina), Buenos Aires Museum of modern art
Buenos Aires (Argentina), Arte de la Argentina Association
Calasetta (Italy), MACC – Calasetta Museum of contemporary art
Miami, FL (USA), Museum of modern art
Montevideo (Uruguay), Museum of modern art
New York, NY (USA), Institute for Studies on Latin American Art, ISLAA
Paris (France), Fonds d’art contemporain – Paris Collections

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

Solo show, Museo de Artes Plásticas Eduardo Sívori, Buenos Aires, 1952
Group show, 6 surrealist painters, Wilenski Gallery, Buenos Aires, 1954
Group show, 4 surrealist painters, Club Cuatro Vientos, Buenos Aires, 1955
Group show, First modern art fair of Mar del Plata, 1956
Solo show, Galatea Gallery, Buenos Aires, 1956
Solo show, Plastica Gallery, Buenos Aires, 1957
Solo show, Rubbers Gallery, Buenos Aires, 1958, 1961, 1964
Group show, Arte moderno des Rio de la Plata, Museo Sívori, Buenos Aires, 1959
Solo show, Galerie Yumar, Buenos Aires, 1960
Solo show, Museo de Arte Moderno, Buenos Aires, 1960
Travelling group show, Pintura Argentina contemporánea, presenting Argentin artists in contemporary art museums of Mexico city, Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires, between 1960 et 1961
Group show, Barsasky Gallery, Rio de Janeiro, 1961
Group show, 8 pintores y escultores, Il corso Gallery, Milan, 1961
Solo show, Museum of modern art of Miami, Miami FL, 1963
Group show, Argentina en el Mundo, Fundacion Torquato Di Tella, Buenos Aires, 1963

Solo show, Pogliani Gallery, Rome, 1964
Solo show, La Metopa Gallery, Bari, 1965
Group show, Suono-movimento-colore, Il obelisco Gallery, Rome, 1966
Group show, Immagini di spazio, Feltrinelli Gallery, Rome, 1966
Group show, Romana e del Lazio Biennale, Rome, 1967
Group show, 4th Metal Art Biennale, Gubbio, 1967
Group show, Meduse Gallery, Rome, 1967
Group show, Participation at the Salvi Price, Sassoferrato, 1968
Group show, Vision 12 (with Lucio Fontana, Juan Rocca,Rey among others), Italo Latin American Institute, Rome, 1969
Group show, 10th Quadriennale of Rome, 1977
Group show, First Biennale of italo latin american graphic technics, Italo latin american Institute, Rome, 1979
Solo show, P21 Gallery, Rome, 1980
Rio de Janeiro Museum of modern art, 1981
Group show, Salon d’automne, Grand Palais, Paris, 1981
Group show, Salon des Grands et Jeunes d’aujourd’hui, Grand Palais, Paris, 1982, 1983
Group show, Art+Objet, Grand Palais, Paris, 1984
Solo show, Inès Blumencweig, Structures sensibles, Maison de l’Amérique Latine with ISLAA, Paris, from October 13, 2022 to January 7 2023

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Maria Laura San Martin, Pintura Argentina Contemporánea, Editorial La Mandrágora, Buenos Aires, 1961
Filiberto Menna, Blumencweig, Pogliani Gallery, Rome, 1964
Enrico Crispolti, Blumencweig, Nuova Foglia, Macerata, Italy (panorama of modern art collection– graphics), 1971
Córdova Iturburu, Ochenta Años de Pintura Argentina, Editorial Librería de la Ciudad, Buenos Aires, 1978

Exhibition catalog Vision 12 Institut Italo-Latino Américain, Rome 1969

Structure multiforme – 1984
Crayon graphite et aquarelle sur papier – 24,6 x 32 cm
Fonds d’art contemporain, Paris

Diane de Polignac Gallery warmly thanks Inès Blumencweig for her trust. The Gallery also thanks Benjamin de Roubaix for his involvement and valuable testimony as well as the Pucciarelli family.

Diane de Polignac Gallery thanks Ariel Aisiks and Jordi Ballart of the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) for their collaboration and their invaluable help.

Galerie Diane de Polignac thanks Domitille d’Orgeval for her enriching text on this artistic period.

INÈS BLUMENCWEIG
Structures dynamiques
Exhibition from January 18 to February 24, 2024

Diane de Polignac Gallery
2 bis, rue de Gribeauval, Paris
www.dianedepolignac.com

Translation: Lucy Johnston
Graphic design: Diane de Polignac Gallery

ISBN: 978-2-9584349-5-3
© Diane de Polignac Gallery, Paris, January 2024
Texts are author’s property

Inès Blumencweig, 2016
Courtesy of the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) Library and Archives
Droits réservés

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